skyfallat221b:

request by anon ▬ Could you possibly do a gifset where Natasha and Steve don’t exactly understand what Bucky is going through post Cap 2, but Clint does, and helps him through it?

(via sssssssim)

analish:

do you ever have those times at 4am where you get so motivated and decide to get all your shit together and then plan out your entire life and future and then the next morning you’re just like lol

(via princesconsuela)

walkingthenarrowway:

  • my reaction to racism is not racism.
  • me pointing out racism is not racism.
  • there is no such thing as reverse racism.
  • POCs can’t be racist. 
  • If you anti-Black, you’re problematic. 

(via missrevived)

missrevived:

itslaroneppl:

mangoestho:

dynastylnoire:

whatisthat-velvet:

"I’m Black, y’all!"

Cover the babies lord

;___________________;

And proud!

My future child

“You should be angry. You must not be bitter. Bitterness is like cancer. It eats upon the host. It doesn’t do anything to the object of its displeasure. So use that anger. You write it. You paint it. You dance it. You march it. You vote it. You do everything about it. You talk it. Never stop talking it.”

—Maya Angelou  (via schlafwandel)

(Source: theremixkid, via complures)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 17, 1849: Harriet Tubman Attempts to Escape From Slavery
On this day in 1849, American abolitionist Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery. She escaped alongside her brothers, Ben and Henry, who forced her to turn back with them after they had second thoughts.
Tubman ran away again shortly afterward without her brothers, this time successfully, using the Underground Railroad as her escape route to the North.
The Underground Railroad was a lifeline for slaves escaping to freedom, and Harriet Tubman became undoubtedly one of its most famous “conductors.”
PBS Black Culture Connection invites you to learn 10 interesting facts about Harriet Tubman.
Photo: Harriet Tubman, full-length portrait, standing with hands on back of a chair between ca. 1860 and 1875 (Library of Congress)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 17, 1849: Harriet Tubman Attempts to Escape From Slavery

On this day in 1849, American abolitionist Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery. She escaped alongside her brothers, Ben and Henry, who forced her to turn back with them after they had second thoughts.

Tubman ran away again shortly afterward without her brothers, this time successfully, using the Underground Railroad as her escape route to the North.

The Underground Railroad was a lifeline for slaves escaping to freedom, and Harriet Tubman became undoubtedly one of its most famous “conductors.”

PBS Black Culture Connection invites you to learn 10 interesting facts about Harriet Tubman.

Photo: Harriet Tubman, full-length portrait, standing with hands on back of a chair between ca. 1860 and 1875 (Library of Congress)

(Source: pbs.org, via dynastylnoire)

humansofnewyork:

"We practiced for about thirty minutes before he actually called my parents. I pretended to be my mom, and tried to think of all the reasons she’d object to us getting married, and he practiced his rebuttals. The actual call was a lot easier than the rehearsal."
(New Delhi, India)

humansofnewyork:

"We practiced for about thirty minutes before he actually called my parents. I pretended to be my mom, and tried to think of all the reasons she’d object to us getting married, and he practiced his rebuttals. The actual call was a lot easier than the rehearsal."

(New Delhi, India)

brownglucose:

medresearch:

How A Dissolvable ‘Tampon’ Could One Day Help Women Stop HIV
University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

“This could offer women a potentially more effective, discreet way to protect themselves from HIV infection by inserting the drug-loaded materials into the vagina before sex,” said Cameron Ball, a UW doctoral student in bioengineering and lead author on a paper in the August issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

The UW team previously found that electrically spun cloth could be dissolved to release drugs. These new results build upon that research, showing that the fiber materials can hold 10 times the concentration of medicine as anti-HIV gels currently under development.Read more »
This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Care about research like this? Sign on to our Thunderclap campaign (http://bit.ly/NIHthunderclap) to tell Congress to finish what it started and pass the FY 2015 Labor-HHS spending bill now to restore sequestration cuts so that the promise of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored research can be realized.

Wow!!!!

brownglucose:

medresearch:

How A Dissolvable ‘Tampon’ Could One Day Help Women Stop HIV

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

“This could offer women a potentially more effective, discreet way to protect themselves from HIV infection by inserting the drug-loaded materials into the vagina before sex,” said Cameron Ball, a UW doctoral student in bioengineering and lead author on a paper in the August issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

The UW team previously found that electrically spun cloth could be dissolved to release drugs. These new results build upon that research, showing that the fiber materials can hold 10 times the concentration of medicine as anti-HIV gels currently under development.
Read more »

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Care about research like this? Sign on to our Thunderclap campaign (http://bit.ly/NIHthunderclap) to tell Congress to finish what it started and pass the FY 2015 Labor-HHS spending bill now to restore sequestration cuts so that the promise of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored research can be realized.

Wow!!!!

(via dynastylnoire)

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